CHRIS-VINCENT Writes: How I Became Less of An IDIOT Which Helped Cut Down My Discontentment

Chris-Vincent Agyapong Febiri

Yesterday, I watched a documentary on Netflix titled Minimalism which looked at how a growing number of people in America have decided to break away from the ‘American dream’ which largely equates success to possessions—without any real evaluation of what really makes an individual happy. Many of the people in the documentary had left their 6 figure paying jobs which made them miserable to live the ‘minimalist lifestyle’–having found content in that.

Personally, I’ve been on a slow journey to becoming a full blown minimalist—some friends think I am already there but I believe I can do more when it comes to minimising how much I have and the sort of importance I place on materialistic possessions.

Currently, I own just two pairs of  Topman jeans (I bought two of the same kind so you cannot even see the difference), about 15 white-long sleeve shirts, a few T-shirts and about 5 coloured long-sleeve shirts. I have about 3 pairs of shoes and a lot of boxer shorts.

I mean, the above is my entire wardrobe—if you add my 3 blazers and 3 suits. Even this, I feel they are too many for one person and I will use the next few weeks to get rid of as many as possible. I want to be able to live on 33 items all together.

A few years ago, I used to be a complete IDIO, just like many people who harbour an unquenchable desire to buy and own more things—with the market continuously ensuring that they are never satisfied with what they already have.

It’s everywhere around us in a form of advertisement: you may have the latest iPhone but within 6 months, another will be on the market, making yours old. As human beings, we have a sickening desire for goods and services—and this insatiable desire is what’s being exploited by the markets around us, which has given birth to consumerism.

For many years, we’ve equated human success and happiness to material things when it’s clear around us that, this is not true and a person’s happiness level does not increase proportionately with an increase in money or material things. Read more